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What’s the Buzz? Bees Around The Home | The Heart of the Farm is the Family – Lancaster Farming


Recommended by Dikshit Aryal, Published on October 21st, 2020

Have you seen any good horror movies lately? Some movies have titles that send a shiver down your spine without even viewing the film. Im talking about names like Sharknado, Snakes on a Plane or, how about Killer Bees? And speaking of bees, things were really buzzing around our farmhouse recently. Im talking about the literal buzzing of winged insects that decided to make our home their home.

Alas, this wasnt my first rodeo with stinging insects. Id had a similar invasion almost 10 years ago. It culminated with my being stung in my own bedroom while sleeping one night. Id been spraying the offenders for weeks, but that nocturnal sting had been the last straw I knew it was time to get serious and call a professional exterminator to solve the problem. I did so and soon those bad-news bees were history.

While checking a potted windowbox of parsley on the deck a few days before, Id spotted a no-legged crawler, a caterpillar that was more than welcome to keep chewing up the herbs I cultivate in containers handy to the kitchen.

This time around, Dennis and I started noticing buzzing winged insects toward the end of summer. They seemed to have a preference for an old chicken crate that I use on the porch as a plant stand in the summer. I thought maybe they were pollinating some of my geraniums in that area near the bottom of a window in the old summer kitchen, now turned into a dining room.

At first, we were reluctant to spray these bugs, both because of their possible benefits, but also because I didnt want to chance damaging my plants. However, Dennis is allergic to bee venom, so we decided action was necessary. We got some flying insect spray, gave the porch area a good spraying and thought our problem was solved. We were wrong.

The next day and the next, there were more bees than ever. Looking at them more closely, we noticed two things these werent honeybees or even carpenter bees and they werent pollinating my plants. Instead, they had apparently taken up residence in some crevices in the summer kitchens brick wall.

We tried to take a live and let live approach to the situation. That worked well for a while, until one day when Dennis was working from home with engineering plans spread across the dining room table, he noticed one of the bees sitting on one of his plans. Then he heard others buzzing about and traced the sound to the inside of the window where we had sprayed the exterior.

By the next morning, these flying insects had started dropping in to visit our dining room. Most of them were on the windowsill, while others had found their way onto walls, ceiling, the floor and lampshades. Some of them were dead, but others were quite lively and, of course, they seemed to have an unnatural attraction for landing on Dennis.

Grasshoppers have been part of the human diet for eons. John the Baptist, for example, lived humbly in the wilderness, wearing a garment of camel hair, held in place by a leather belt, and famously subsisting on a very healthy diet of locusts aka grasshoppers and wild honey.

It became obvious that an alternate worksite was necessary, but where else did we have a large enough expanse of table space to accommodate the sizable drawings Dennis works on? It required some thinking out of the box or, more accurately, thinking out of the closet to come up with a solution.

Stashed away inside a closet in another part of the house were two red vinyl-topped card tables that are older than I am. One had belonged to my parents, a gift my Bowman grandparents had given to each of their children one Christmas; the other identical card table had actually belonged to my Bowman grandparents.

Those card tables had been hard-used. My mother brought hers out whenever we had company, setting plates of cookies, baskets of pretzels and cups of punch and coffee on top of it. I recall my grandmother using her card table in much the same way on the Christmas Eves we gathered at her house.

I dont remember our card table ever being used for playing cards, but relatives sat around it many a winter Sunday evening playing spirited hands of dominoes. I sometimes used it to do my homework or work on a jigsaw puzzle.

Those activities ceased as years passed and the twin card tables sat unused, propped against the closet wall. Fortunately, I came up with the bright idea of setting them up, side by side, over the top of the living room coffee table to make a temporary work surface for Dennis.

It wasnt ideal, but it got the job done as we battened down all the hatches leading from the dining room and kitchen, which shared an open doorway between them. Dennis took shelter in his new temporary office and called an exterminator, who showed up a day later. He identified our unwanted guests as yellow jackets and spread some powder into the crevices they had excavated into the old mortar of our brick house.

Soon the yellow jackets were dropping like flies in the dining room. We swept them up by the dozen, and sometimes assisted their demise with the flick of a fly swatter. It took a few days, but eventually their eviction was completed, the cracks in the mortar were filled and life in the farmhouse started buzzing along again without our bee-impersonating buddies.

Sue Bowman is a freelance writer in southeastern Pennsylvania.

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What's the Buzz? Bees Around The Home | The Heart of the Farm is the Family - Lancaster Farming

Squirrel Control & Prevention Services | Viking Pest Control


Recommended by Dikshit Aryal, Published on October 21st, 2020

Viking Pest does NOT treat, trap, nor exterminate Chipmunks due to local regulations. For more information, please call Viking at 1-800-618-2847

If you have a home or business in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, or Delaware, protecting your property from pests is an important part of taking care of your property. Some pests can be harmful to your property and cost you money, while others can pose a threat to you, your family, or your customers. Squirrels can be a problem in buildings due to nesting and reproducing in vents, attics, and other small spaces, and theyre known to carry diseases that can harm people. Squirrels are pests and If not addressed, these furry creatures can become a real nuisance. To protect your home or business from squirrels, you need to learn about the behavior of this pest, take steps for prevention, and find effective treatment options should an infestation occur.

Squirrels are quick, small, bushy-tailed rodents found almost anywhere throughout New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware. Squirrels are in the same family as prairie dogs, chipmunks, and marmots, and they can look similar. Pest control experts explain although there are more than 200 species of squirrels, they all fit into one of three categories: tree squirrels, ground squirrels, and flying squirrels. Squirrels indigenous to the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Squirrels range in size from 3 to 36 inches long, but in North America, the most common squirrels are 15 to 20 inches long, weighing about a pound. Squirrels eat mostly seeds and nuts, but sometimes theyre attracted to fruits and vegetables and even occasionally eat insects or small vertebrates.

During these unprecedented times, Viking Pest is committed to keeping homes and businesses throughout NJ, PA, DE, and the Eastern Shore of Maryland healthy, safe, and pest-free. Viking Pest is open and providing contactless, exterior pest control services to keep invaders out of your home or business.

All squirrels have long bodies covered in short, thick fur and four legs. Their hind legs are longer than their front legs, and they can sit up or scurry around on all fours. You may see them running around on the ground, eating with their front feet, or climbing trees. Pest control experts explain the most common squirrels in the New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware areas are gray squirrels, which you can identify by their white underbelly and whitish to gray fur. These are medium-sized squirrels, similar in size to fox squirrels. Fox squirrels, which are slightly rarer than gray squirrels, have more yellow underbellies and may appear striped with gray and pale gray. Pine squirrels may have more reddish fur on top.

Squirrels in North America are well adapted to human beings, so theyre common in urban as well as rural areas. Exterminators explain that food and shelter attract these pests, so they may come into your home or business through small openings that allow them to nest and make a new home. These critters are also attracted to food that falls from trees, such as fruit and nuts. Since theyre not afraid of humans, many squirrels come right up to you and beg for something to eat. Feeding them is not wise, as theyll return again and again if they know they can get food from you.

Squirrels are pests and can make a home in your place of business or house, wreaking havoc by chewing on woodwork, ceiling panels, electrical wires, and insulation. Squirrels may also do damage to the exterior of your house or building in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, or Delaware when they chew their way in. These furry pests can also contaminate water supplies with feces and urine, leave uneaten food to rot, and introduce diseases to your property that can harm humans. If they chew on electrical wires and strip them, they could even cause a fire. Not only that, but they can get trapped in small spaces in walls or in your attic and perish, creating a foul stench that can permeate your house or business. The best way to get rid of squirrels and protect your home or business from these unfortunate circumstances is to seek the help and recommendations of pest control experts.

In captivity, some squirrels can live anywhere from 18 to 24 years. However, in the wild in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware, squirrels are known to live anywhere from 6 to 10 years, depending on the species. Females generally live longer, up to 13 years or so. Females can bear young after their first year, and they typically have two litters per year, one in spring and one at the end of summer. Each litter can have an average of two to five kittens, so a squirrel infestation can grow pretty quickly in your home or business if you dont address the issues and work to get rid of squirrels with the professional assistance of a pest control expert.

Preventing squirrels from invading your home or business in the first place is the biggest key to protecting yourself and your property. Exterminators recommend you never feed squirrels that show up in your yard or around your business. Be sure to rake up fallen fruits, nuts, or other food that could attract them, and keep garbage cans tightly closed. You can scare them away if you have a dog or a cat that likes to chase them. If you dont have pets, a few well-placed plastic statues could spook them and keep them from returning. Squirrels dont like certain kinds of flowers like daffodils, snowdrops, allium, and hyacinth. Planting these flowers might deter them, and if thats not enough, you can make squirrel baffles to go around trees or put netting around plants. To keep them out of your building or house, look for openings, cracks, or weaknesses that they could squeeze through or chew on to gain access. Pest control experts recommend checking the roof and eaves and make sure to repair any holes quickly so they cant get in.

Viking Pest offers expert treatment designed to effectively and efficiently control and prevent squirrels from invading your home or business in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware. Our use of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) techniques focuses on finding the core of the pest concern and controlling squirrels from the source. Through IPM, pest control materials are selected and applied in a manner that minimizes risks to human health, pets, and the environment. Call Viking today for your FREE and NO OBLIGATION estimate at 1-800-618-2847 or schedule online today!

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Squirrel Control & Prevention Services | Viking Pest Control

How to Get Rid of Squirrels in the Attic – This Old House


Recommended by Dikshit Aryal, Published on October 21st, 2020

Squirrels in your attic can bite into electrical wiring, insulation, and boards, causing significant damage. In this article, the This Old House Reviews team explains how to get rid of squirrels in the attic and covers how to prevent them from infesting your home. In particular, we recommend three of the top-rated pest control companies for wildlife removal.

Before enacting treatment, confirm that the animal youre hearing in your attic is a squirrel. Here are a few signs that these fluffy-tailed animals are present in your home:

Once you determine there are squirrels in your attic, take the steps below to remove them from your home:

Once squirrels have been removed from your attic, there are a number of ways to prevent them from returning, which include:

The This Old House Reviews team analyzed every major pest control company in the United States based on plans, customer service, pricing, and other factors. Our analysis found that Terminix, Orkin, and Aptive are the best pest control companies in the industry. We recommend contacting these companies using the table below to help assist you with squirrel removal.

To share feedback or ask a question about this article, send a note to our Reviews team at reviews@thisoldhousereviews.com.

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How to Get Rid of Squirrels in the Attic - This Old House

Montclair NJ Pest Control Services | Viking Pest Control


Recommended by Dikshit Aryal, Published on October 21st, 2020

Just under 40,000 people call Montclair Township, NJ home, and for a good reason. Nearly 154 acres of parks make for a beautiful and breathtaking landscape throughout all seasons. The town also has an impressive 40,000 shade trees, enough for each resident to have their own to get out of the sun during the summer months. But with this many parks and trees dotting the landscape, the inevitable pest problems arise. Residents have a lengthy list of invasive pests to deal with every day of the year. Thankfully, the Essex County pest control experts at Viking Pest have over 40 years of experience identifying, exterminating, and controlling each type of pest you may encounter in Montclair, NJ.

During these unprecedented times, Viking Pest is committed to keeping homes and businesses throughout NJ, PA, DE, and the Eastern Shore of Maryland healthy, safe, and pest-free. Viking Pest is open and providing contactless, exterior pest control services to keep invaders out of your home or business.

Many of the 2.2 million street trees in the state of New Jersey can be found in Montclair Township. These lush trees make for great shade and an even better landscape, but they also invite a unique list of pests into the Essex County area. As youre not allowed to remove any of the Township trees in the area, youll have to contend with pests like the Emerald Ash Borer, carpenter bees, and more.

The New Jersey pest control experts at Viking Pest list the most common pests youll find in Montclair:

Controlling pests in Essex County, NJ requires strong knowledge of the area, information on the type of vegetation youll encounter, and an understanding of how the different local pests invade and operate in your home or business. Many pest control companies try cookie-cutter fixes to get rid of multiple pest types at once. The problem is this simply doesnt work and leaves Montclair residents paying for unnecessary and additional treatments.

At Viking Pest, we specialize in minimally invasive and specifically tailored approaches to handling your pest problems. In order to get the best results, a plan must be developed for each type of pest youre dealing with, such as one of several species of ants, like pavement ants, carpenter ants, or odorous house ants explain the local Montclair, NJ exterminators at Viking Pest. Understanding how each pest in Montclair, NJ reacts to seasonal changes and the unique environmental elements of the area are critical to getting results. Save yourself the time and money youll waste using a big-box solution and use local experts who fully understand Essex County.

Viking Pest offers expert treatment designed to effectively and efficiently control and prevent local pests from invading your home or business in Montclair, NJ. Call Viking today for your FREE and NO OBLIGATION estimate at 1-800-618-2847 or schedule online today!

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Montclair NJ Pest Control Services | Viking Pest Control

What’s the Buzz? | The Heart of the Farm is the Family – Lancaster Farming


Recommended by Dikshit Aryal, Published on October 20th, 2020

Have you seen any good horror movies lately? Some movies have titles that send a shiver down your spine without even viewing the film. Im talking about names like Sharknado, Snakes on a Plane or, how about Killer Bees?

And speaking of bees, things were really buzzing around our farmhouse recently. Im talking about the literal buzzing of winged insects that decided to make our home their home.

Alas, this wasnt my first rodeo with stinging insects. Id had a similar invasion almost 10 years ago. It culminated with my being stung in my own bedroom while sleeping one night. Id been spraying the offenders for weeks, but that nocturnal sting had been the last straw I knew it was time to get serious and call a professional exterminator to solve the problem. I did so and soon those bad-news bees were history.

This time around, Dennis and I started noticing buzzing winged insects toward the end of summer. They seemed to have a preference for an old chicken crate that I use on the porch as a plant stand in the summer. I thought maybe they were pollinating some of my geraniums in that area near the bottom of a window in the old summer kitchen, now turned into a dining room.

At first, we were reluctant to spray these bugs, both because of their possible benefits, but also because I didnt want to chance damaging my plants. However, Dennis is allergic to bee venom, so we decided action was necessary. We got some flying insect spray, gave the porch area a good spraying and thought our problem was solved. We were wrong.

The next day and the next, there were more bees than ever. Looking at them more closely, we noticed two things these werent honeybees or even carpenter bees and they werent pollinating my plants. Instead, they had apparently taken up residence in some crevices in the summer kitchens brick wall.

We tried to take a live and let live approach to the situation. That worked well for a while, until one day when Dennis was working from home with engineering plans spread across the dining room table, he noticed one of the bees sitting on one of his plans. Then he heard others buzzing about and traced the sound to the inside of the window where we had sprayed the exterior.

By the next morning, these flying insects had started dropping in to visit our dining room. Most of them were on the windowsill, while others had found their way onto walls, ceiling, the floor and lampshades. Some of them were dead, but others were quite lively and, of course, they seemed to have an unnatural attraction for landing on Dennis.

It became obvious that an alternate worksite was necessary, but where else did we have a large enough expanse of table space to accommodate the sizable drawings Dennis works on? It required some thinking out of the box or, more accurately, thinking out of the closet to come up with a solution.

Stashed away inside a closet in another part of the house were two red vinyl-topped card tables that are older than I am. One had belonged to my parents, a gift my Bowman grandparents had given to each of their children one Christmas; the other identical card table had actually belonged to my Bowman grandparents.

Those card tables had been hard-used. My mother brought hers out whenever we had company, setting plates of cookies, baskets of pretzels and cups of punch and coffee on top of it. I recall my grandmother using her card table in much the same way on the Christmas Eves we gathered at her house.

I dont remember our card table ever being used for playing cards, but relatives sat around it many a winter Sunday evening playing spirited hands of dominoes. I sometimes used it to do my homework or work on a jigsaw puzzle.

Those activities ceased as years passed and the twin card tables sat unused, propped against the closet wall. Fortunately, I came up with the bright idea of setting them up, side by side, over the top of the living room coffee table to make a temporary work surface for Dennis.

It wasnt ideal, but it got the job done as we battened down all the hatches leading from the dining room and kitchen, which shared an open doorway between them. Dennis took shelter in his new temporary office and called an exterminator, who showed up a day later. He identified our unwanted guests as yellow jackets and spread some powder into the crevices they had excavated into the old mortar of our brick house.

Soon the yellow jackets were dropping like flies in the dining room. We swept them up by the dozen, and sometimes assisted their demise with the flick of a fly swatter. It took a few days, but eventually their eviction was completed, the cracks in the mortar were filled and life in the farmhouse started buzzing along again without our bee-impersonating buddies.

Sue Bowman is a freelance writer in southeastern Pennsylvania.

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What's the Buzz? | The Heart of the Farm is the Family - Lancaster Farming

Recognizing Rodent Infestations – FamilyEducation


Recommended by Dikshit Aryal, Published on October 17th, 2020

In the Nick of Time

You can often identify the kind of rodent you're dealing with by the size and shape of their droppings. Mice, being the smaller of the two types, leave behind the smallest droppings, measuring on average 1/8 to 1/4 inch. They're about the size of a grain of rice, thin or rod-shaped with pointed ends. Roof rats are larger than house mice but smaller than Norway rats. Their droppings average about 1/4 inch and are spindle-shaped with pointed ends. Droppings left by Norway rats are the largest, measuring between 1/4 to 1/2 inch in length. They're moon- or crescent-shaped and are typically shiny black in color, but this can vary, depending on what they eat.

To track where rodents are traveling, you can create your own dust by sprinkling baby powder, cornstarch, or flour along suspicious areas. This is also an effective approach for monitoring rodent abatement efforts.

Droppings, typically left behind in kitchen cabinets, pantries, cupboards, drawers, bins, and anywhere else they think they might find food, or where they scurry to avoid predators. Rodents are prolific poopers, so it's pretty easy to spot if you have an infestation. It's also not uncommon to see droppings along walls, on top of wall studs or beams, near nests, and in boxes, bags, old furniture, and other objects.

Squeaks and other noises. Rodents aren't what you'd call quiet. If they're in your house, you'll hear squeaks, rustling, and scampering sounds as they move about and nest. Noises are often more apparent at night as you're going to bed and they're waking up.

Urine pools or trails. Rodents are notorious for having weak bladders, and they'll dribble all over the place. House mice sometimes make things called "urinating pillars," which are small mounds consisting of grease, dirt, and yes, urine. Sometimes you'll see tiny drops of urine leading to a mound.

Nibble marks on food boxes, food, or containers. These telltale signs are often accompanied by nearby droppings.

Nests. Rodents build nests from soft, fuzzy, or warm materials, such as fabric, furniture stuffing, quilt batting, shredded paper, grass, and twigs, and will typically stuff them into sheltered, out-of-the-way places like boxes, cabinets and closets, walls, even the subspace between ceilings and floors. Other possible mouse nest sites include dressers, behind and inside appliances, and machinery, even computer cases -- basically, anywhere it's cozy and warm.

Grease marks. Mice can wedge through openings as small as a quarter of an inch in size. As they do, they often leave greasy smears caused by oil and dirt in their coats behind. The marks left by mice are fainter than those left by rats. If you find large greasy smears, you should suspect a rat infestation instead.

Gnaw marks. Gnawing is a defining characteristic of all rodents. They do it to keep their incisor teeth, which grow continually, in check. Wood is a favorite,but they'll pretty much chew on whatever suits them. This includes electrical wire, which, as noted in Electrical Fires, makes them a leading cause of structural fires. On wood, newer gnaws are light colored. They turn darker with age. Sometimes you won't see gnaw marks, but you'll see what looks like fine wood chips or coarse sawdust, especially along baseboards, door and window frames, and cabinets.

Holes in food packaging. Rodents will nibble into anything they can smell, including boxes and bags of pasta, rice, beans, and grain products. Dog food bags are also prime-time rodent magnets, and especially so for rats, who like the meaty smell as much as canines do. Another popular nibble, although not a food product: soap.

An "off" aroma, or smell. House mice have a distinctive musky odor. It's hard to describe, but once you smell it, you'll never forget it.

Tracks. Look for footprints or tail marks in dusty spots. The type of track and tail marks can tell you what kind of rodent you're battling. Mice have the smallest feet, measuring 3/8 inch or less. Rat tracks average between 3/4 to 1 inch. Rats also drag their tails, which leaves a mark between their feet tracks. If tracks are hard to spot, shining a flashlight across a suspicious area can help illuminate them.

Pet excitement. If Rover or Miss Kitty is acting a bit nuts (more nuts than usual?), especially around a possible mouse hiding area, chances are good a critter has been there or is still there.

Rodents are nocturnal, so you probably won't see many of them unless you've got a big infestation going on. That said, mice tend to be more active than rats during daylight hours.

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Recognizing Rodent Infestations - FamilyEducation

Marilyn Hagerty: Pests come and go with seasons – Grand Forks Herald


Recommended by Dikshit Aryal, Published on October 16th, 2020

The world seems upside down with the invasion of the coronavirus. But the birds, the bees and the mice know winter is coming.

Gone are the yellow jackets that nestled down in the shrubs during the summer days. Dan Mayers, an exterminator, says they are around into October. And then its time for mice that will be looking for a warm place to spend the winter.

Brian Bohlman, a second generation exterminator, also says the rodents are busy in the fall.

Its the same for Robert Derrick, an exterminator in East Grand Forks. He says the yellow jackets were crazy this year.

They were everywhere. In homes, along foundations," he said.

Then there are gophers and squirrels. And Derrick says the rabbits are harmless.

They just like to eat shrubs," he said.

He has most calls for help from May to December. June is the busiest at lake places, where there may be spiders.

Exterminators get calls year round. They say there are problems with bed bugs and cockroaches. And looking back, they remember the pigeons that held conventions beneath the underpass on Washington Street.

Right now, its what Derrick calls exclusion time. Time to find the openings. Close them up.

Wonder continues

Life goes on in a somewhat subdued way this October. Gone are the Friday gatherings of UND Hawk fans. Gone until later are the UND volleyball games.

Still, there is the joy of the pumpkin patches and the rustling of leaves. There is wonder wonder when it will snow.

Around the Grand Forks area, there are wondrous, spooky Halloween displays. The greatest ghost seen lately is the one at 802 S. Ninth Street.

Ask Marilyn

Q. Where is the Hawk?

A. It was watching when the the new steam plant was dedicated at UND.

Q. What interesting license plates were spotted around here this week?

A. UMK3 and 4UB4CHN.

Patty and Dave

Cheerful people of the week: Patty and Dave Schoenrock.

Reach Marilyn Hagerty at mhagerty@gra.midco.net or by telephone at (701) 772-2055.

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Marilyn Hagerty: Pests come and go with seasons - Grand Forks Herald

Invasion alert: aggressive Oriential hornet’s spread in Malta is growing – MaltaToday


Recommended by Dikshit Aryal, Published on October 14th, 2020

To the relief of entomophobes, as colder days start setting in, the insects we love to hate start crawling back into their underground hiding spots.

But while summer creepy crawlies retreat, Malta is still facing two very antagonizing species of insects the Oriental Hornet and the Termite.

In the last month or so, people have reported increased sightings of the infamous Vespa orientalis, or the Oriental Hornet (unan Bagal) in both public and secluded species.

Speaking to MaltaToday, pest exterminator Arnold Sciberras said the Oriental Hornet is now found in the Mediterranean basin, the Middle East, the United Arab Emirates, India and Madagascar. However, due to human introduction, its habitat has spread to South America up to Mexico. It is indigenous to the Maltese islands.

The hornet, reddish brown in colour with a distinctive yellow discoloration on its head and abdomen, starts appearing at around May all through to October.

Arnold Sciberras said the Oriental Hornets temperament is aggressive while also being a predator. It can kill large insects like grasshoppers and the highly beneficial honey bee. Some have also been recorded attacking bird and mice nests. The hornet can be sometimes be seen stalking public areas for human food.

Sciberras said that this year alone he has tended to as much as 3,766 hornet nests, each with populations varying between 30 to around 400 hornets.

The pest exterminator also warned of its very painful sting, with sting victims urged to seek medical attention. An urticarial rash, facial swelling and difficulty in breathing, shortness of breath and wheezing can occur. Victims have also reported low blood pressure and a fast heartbeat.

He also said that unlike the honey bees stinger, the hornets stinger is not barbed, and therefore can attack multiple times when triggered. When a hornet is threatened, it releases pheromones from its body, mobilizing the rest of the nest to attack. Attacks can also be triggered by perfumes and other volatile chemicals when the hornets mistake the scent for pheromones.

People who spot a hornet invasion should never approach the nest, and are advised to seek professional help.

Another pest which has swept the island is the termite, according to Sciberras. Locally most people are unaware that we even have termites. In fact, they were of such minor importance they were classified in laymans terms just as susa, which in Maltese refers to any insect that in one of its life stages attacks live or dead wood.

If left unchecked termites can have devastating effects and turn a property into ruins, according to Sciberras. Up to 10 years ago he recorded around 250 colonies mostly in the north-west of Malta, but in the past seven years, they have spread in so many areas that is impossible to keep track anymore.

Termites are weak and relatively fragile insects that need to stay moist to survive. When exposed they can be easily overpowered and devoured by at least three species of local ants and other predators. They avoid these perils by covering their trails with tubing made of feces, plant matter, saliva and soil. They can therefore remain out of sight for a long period of time.

Termites do not limit themselves to wood and also damage paper, cloth, carpets and other cellulosic materials. Two species are known to exist locally at present: The garden termite (Kalotermes flavicollis) and the damp wood termite (Reticulitermes lucifugus), the latter being the main household pest.

A third species is being studied by the exterminator, who said that they can not only travel through loose ground but can also dig through rock and concrete if need be. This theory was confirmed this year when more aggressive behaviour and household invasion was noted.

While termites do not pose any physical danger to humans, the damage they can cause can be extensive and irreparable, Sciberras warned.

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Invasion alert: aggressive Oriential hornet's spread in Malta is growing - MaltaToday

How Arachnophobia Became the Perfect Creepy Crawly Horror Comedy – Den of Geek


Recommended by Dikshit Aryal, Published on October 11th, 2020

A long-time producer who had worked with everyone from Orson Welles to Martin Scorsese prior to founding Amblin Entertainment with his wife Kathleen Kennedy and long-time collaborator Steven Spielberg, Arachnophobia represented Marshalls directorial debut. In many ways, he couldnt have picked a better project.

While the old Hollywood adage claimed you should never work with children or animals, Marshall had an impressive track record with both especially animals.He had overseen the uses of several snakes in Raiders of the Lost Ark as well as Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and orchestrated the plague of rats that pop up in the sewers of Venice during Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

More importantly, like Spielberg, he wasnt averse to cranking up the PG scares whether it be a melting Nazi or the desiccated corpse of a spider bite victim.The key to cooking up a scare in Arachnophobia, however, were the arachnids themselves.

Marshall and his production team auditioned a variety of spiders for the film, whittlingit down to a shortlist of four distinct species, including wolf spiders, tarantulas, and huntsman spiders.

I held what I called the Spider Olympics, he explained in an interview withAmblin.I really put them through their paces to see if they could climb a glass, if they looked scary, to see how big they were or if they looked good on camera and how we could motivate them.

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How Arachnophobia Became the Perfect Creepy Crawly Horror Comedy - Den of Geek

Mum afraid to go into yard of her Prescot home because of rat infestation – St Helens Star


Recommended by Dikshit Aryal, Published on October 9th, 2020

A RAT infestation has left a mother too afraid to go into her yard just two months after moving into her new house in Prescot.

Sam Davies and her young daughter moved into the house in Kemble Street in August and since then has had rats in her loft and back yard.

Ms Davies has already called an exterminator out once, but the problem has continued and she now has to wait two weeks for another visit from pest control.

She told the Local Democracy Reporting Service she was convinced that a fly-tip on vacant ground next to her yard was to blame for the rodent problem.

Fly-tipped waste in an alleyway off Kemble Street, Prescot. Mum Sam Davies fears the rubbish is attracting rats.

She said: I definitely think the rats are coming from that area of yard and a neighbour has said she has seen them coming out of the bushes on the other side of the road.

Ive had rats running around in my loft and the street, they have been seen in my yard and the neighbours yards and houses.

Ive had someone out to kill the rats in my loft but they are back again so my dad has had to go up and put more poison down whilst I wait for the pest control again who cant get to me until October 19.

Ms Davies added that she had reported the fly-tip to Knowsley Council shortly after moving in, but has not had any luck in getting the issue resolved.

She said: I reported the fly tipping on the Knowsley Council website but heard nothing for about four weeks then reported it again recently and sent a long email to environmental health.

Someone from environmental health called me and asked if I could email over some photos which I did but I heard nothing back.

I got so fed up of going around in circles so I just asked my dad if he could try and get somewhere with it all, he is more assertive than me, but nobody got back to him.

A spokesperson for Knowsley Council said several nearby properties had received enforcement notices requiring them to clear up the rubbish.

The spokesperson said: The councils pest control team received a complaint on September 12, 2020 and subsequently visited the residents address on 15 September to place bait within the property.

A revisit was scheduled on 1 October, however the council were unable to gain access to the property to continue treatment. An investigating officer will contact the resident again to try and gain access.

On 25 September the council served seven enforcement notices on nearby properties in relation to managing waste and for provision of bins, and the council has previously carried out action days in relation to management of waste regarding this alleyway and others within Prescot which are unadopted and do not belong to the council.

The residents in that locality will also receive letters outlining their household duty of care.

In the meantime, if the resident wishes to re-book the appointment with the pest control service, they will attend at a convenient time to continue their treatment.

Read more from the original source:
Mum afraid to go into yard of her Prescot home because of rat infestation - St Helens Star


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