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Bed Bugs Be Gone: Rutgers Gets Nod for Fighting Pests – New … – TAPinto.net

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ Theyre the creepy, crawly, nasty things that bite in the night.

Bed bugsno one likes em, and few know how to kill em.

But they stand little chance against Changlu Wang. He heads Rutgers Universitys urban entomology lab and has strived for years to rid New Jersey low-income housing projects, including in New Brunswick, of bed bugs. He and his team have earned the respect of their colleagues and beneficiaries in their efforts to develop new strategies to combat this scourge.

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In fact, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced today that, under Wangs leadership, Rutgers is one of four winners of the HUD Secretarys Award for Healthy Homes. The honor recognizes excellence in making indoor environments healthier by improving homes, according to a news release.

The recipients of this award understand the strong connection between where we live and how healthy we are, HUD Secretary Ben Carson, who was appointed this year by President Donald Trump, said in a statement. They demonstrate innovative approaches to making homes healthier, and exemplify the outstanding work thats taking place throughout the nation.

In his drive to fight bed bugs, Wang worked with poor communities, manufacturers and other universities to build better integrated pest management plans, according to the release.

What is an integrated pest management strategy? Well, according to the federal government, it boils down to how workers and residents prevent and control bugs and the like, while respecting the environment.

Wang and his team received a HUD grant in 2013 to implement and evaluate a model bed bug management program in poor communities. He partnered with three Garden State housing authorities and worked in more than 2,000 apartment units to pull off the study, which closed last year, according to the news release.

It designed and implemented a low-cost and highly effective bed bug monitoring protocol and a model IPM program, HUD wrote in its press release, noting that Wangs work was published in a respected peer-reviewed journal on bugs.

Wangs work also touched New Brunswick. In 2012, he agreed to help the city Housing Authority tackle its bed bug problems, according to Rutgers. He found a number of infested apartments and, within six months, killed 96 percent of bed bugs there.

But the Rutgers researcher and his team also planted seeds that could prove more valuable in the long-term fight against the pests.

The really good thing about him was that he didnt just come in like an exterminator and lay down some stuff, the housing authoritys executive director, John Clarke, told Rutgers. He educated our staff and residents about what caused the problem and what we might do to eliminate the problem.

Indeed, Wang and his team have proactively tried to teach residents, especially those in low-income areas, best practices to prevent and control bed bug infestations. This online guide, for instance, dispels common myths and highlights what residents should do to protect themselves.

The three other winners of the award include the Denver Housing Authority, for breaking up concentrated poverty and ushering in mixed-used development; Vermonts Weatherization One Touch Program, which helps increase access to health and energy efficiency; and Washingtons Tribal Healthy Homes Network, for addressing asthma in native communities.

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Bed Bugs Be Gone: Rutgers Gets Nod for Fighting Pests – New … – TAPinto.net

Pawcatuck rat problem gets worse – The Westerly Sun

PAWCATUCK Calling it a townwide problem, homeowners in the Courtland, William and Moss Street area are sounding the alarm about rats in their neighborhood.

On the Stonington Community Forum group on Facebook, Elise Dessaules Adcock, a resident of William Street, posted Monday that her family had killed seven rats so far and when officials from Ledge Light Health District, which replaced the towns health department in April, visited her home, they said Adcock would have to pay for eradication.

We thought notifying the town was a good thing, but when Ledge Light came out, we were told they are OUR rats and we had to hire someone to take care of the problem, she wrote.

Adcock posted a picture of a rat on her property and a hole where a rat ate through a wall in her garage. Adding that she has lived on her property for 20 years and never seen a rat, Adcock said, This isnt a cheap issue to deal with and its not going to solve the problem with only a couple of us trying to take care of it.

On the forum, Janice Meagher responded, But also nuts that the town isnt helping since it seems its a pretty widespread area that is impacted.

In early June, Ledge Light responded to complaints of a rat infestation at 1 Millan Terrace, owned by Terrance Holbrook and Ronald Kutz. Holbrook and his sister, Rebecca Holbrook, lived at the house, where she had been feeding rats with bird food. Ledge Light issued a public health order for a licensed exterminator to assess the home and take steps to eradicate the rats.

On June 9, Ryan McCammon, who is the supervisor of environmental health for Ledge Light, and First Selectman Rob Simmons held a public meeting for area residents at the police station to go over preventive and abatement measures since the rats were spreading into surrounding neighborhoods.

On June 12, McCammon said he went door to door in the surrounding neighborhoods, including Frank Street and homes nearby on Broad Street and Swan Street, to pass out information.

Simmons said the town would assume the initial financial burden, hiring Griggs and Browne, a licensed exterminator from Waterford, to do abatement work at 1 Millan Terrace. The firm initially removed about 50 dead rats from the property.

The rats, identified as Norway rats, burrow into holes in foundations and structures to make their nests, preferably close to available food and water. They typically weigh about three-quarters of a pound to one pound and their bodies are about 6 to 8 inches long with 6-inch tails. Since they can breed 12 times per year and have 8 to 12 young per litter, rats can populate an area within a very short period of time.

Several residents thought it was unfair that the town helped one family, but wouldnt assume responsibility for what has become a widespread problem.

Jess Beck Lomax wrote, They wont help you, but your tax dollars are paying for the clean up on Millan Terrance.

Adcock responded, Right and if only a couple of us are trying to take care of the problem, the problem isnt going to go away!

Lomax responded that Adcock should call a local news station or newspaper to bring attention to the towns financial assistance to one family but not to others.

Adcock said shed spent around $50-plus so far to take care of the problem, but now getting pest control in tomorrow which will cost around $200, plus $40 per month and thats a lower estimate since another place was going to charge us $350 to $450 dollars for 60 days!

Many residents on the Facebook forum also saw individual home exterminations and do-it-yourself remedies as a Band-Aid to a much larger problem.

Alzira M. Silveira said, Even if you do pest control and get rid of those rats if theyre in the neighbors yards as well wont they still come back to you?

Savage Jenny said the problem was more widespread.

Ive had Terminix at my house on Mechanic St. for over a month!!! According to them its also on the other side of the river in Westerly and takes up several streets.

Ant Miceli wrote the rats were on Morgan and Robinson streets as well.

Ive also heard that Westerly had a problem as well. Something must have changed in the river to be forcing them all up both sides of it.

I too think its a town issue, wrote Janet Knight, who said she saw one crossing the West Broad Street end of William Street last week.

Ant Miceli conveyed a message from Selectman Michael Spellman, who said he was aware of the rat issue that has seemingly developed overnight and exists in the Moss, William and Courtland Street area.

Ive called Town Hall and First Selectman Rob Simmons and ensured Ledge Light Health District will commence operations ASAP to address and mitigate the problem, Spellman said. In the interim eliminate any outside food source i.e. cat or dog food on your porch and keep garbage cans tightly sealed. Secure basements and ground level doors as well so you dont attract or harbor displaced or wandering rats. Do not feed rats under any circumstance as that will attract them. Rats can survive on an ounce of food and water a day and usually live within 1,000 feet of a food source. More ready food, more rats. Itll take a little bit but it will get fixed. Thank you all for contacting me so we can address this issue quick.

Adcock said she had also been in touch with Spellman and Simmons.

I know that this issue will get taken care of … but, if anyone has any issues, they should contact them at the town hall, she wrote.

For more information, contact McCammon at Stonington Town Hall at 860-535-5010. Information about rat eradication is also available at http://www.ledgelighthd.org.

chewitt@thewesterlysun.com

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Pawcatuck rat problem gets worse – The Westerly Sun

Rats taking over Brooklyn grandmother’s home – New York’s PIX11 / WPIX-TV

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CROWN HEIGHTS, Brooklyn A Brooklyn grandmother is a security guard by day, but it’s at night when she’s home that she’s scared.

Sharon Sanders has spotted rats lurking inside herSterling Place apartment many times over the last few years.

“I’m scared. I’m scared,” Sanders said. “I have small grandkids and rats are taking over my living room.”

Sanders three grandchildren all live with her. She’s complained many times over the years about the rats.

She captured a giant sewer rat jump from her computer table to her kitchen flooron cellphone video.

“I’ve been making complaints with housing for two years and nothing,” said Sanders. “I mean, they’re big. They’re taking over.”

Sanders wants new cabinets, regular visits by exterminators and for the holes under her sink to be closed up.

PIX11news reached out to the New York City Housing Authority.

A spokesperson said, “This situation is unacceptable. We will do better to ensure all NYCHA residents have clean, safe homes. Staff is at the residents home now making extensive repairs and an exterminator will visit today.

If you have a story reach out to monica morales on Facebook at monicamoralestv.

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Rats taking over Brooklyn grandmother’s home – New York’s PIX11 / WPIX-TV

New York unveils $32-million fight vs rats – Inquirer.net

Manuel Junior Medina, an exterminator for M&M Environmental, displays a glue trap littered with droppings and hair which a rat chewed its way out of in a basement in Manhattans Lower East Side on February 21, 2013 in New York City. New York unveiled a new $32 million effort Wednesday to cull thousands of them with rodent-proof trash cans and tighter garbage rules. AFP FILE

NEW YORK, United States Desperate to turn the tide in its war on rats, New York unveiled a new $32 million effort Wednesday to cull thousands of them with rodent-proof trash cans and tighter garbage rules.

Rodents are one of the least savory aspect of life in Americas financial and cultural capital, a daily menace scurrying between subway tracks or darting around trash bags dumped on the street for collection.

English novelist Charles Dickens complained about rodents when he visited in 1842 and last year the health department received a record 31,362 rat-complaints from irate New Yorkers ringing into a help line.

The new measures will be rolled out in Chinatown, the East Village and the Lower East Side in downtown Manhattan, around Grand Concourse in the Bronx and in Bushwick, Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn.

Its been a problem for way too long, Mayor Bill de Blasio admitted Wednesday, unveiling what he called a change of approach after comparing extermination efforts over the years to bailing out a leaky boat.

The latest plan seeks to cull rats by 70 percent in target areas by depriving them of food, and goes hand in glove with existing extermination programs.

Money will be spent on rat-resistant trash cans, replacing dirt basement floors with concrete in public housing, increasing trash collection and forcing larger buildings to put out garbage only shortly before trash collection.

Fines will also be increased for private businesses that dump garbage illegally, up from $1,500 to $5,000, and rising to $20,000 for multiple violations.

If successful, the $32 million initiative will be rolled out to other areas.

Legend has it that there as many rats as humans 8.4 million but Columbia University statistician Jonathan Auerbach in 2014 debunked the myth, estimating the number of rats at two million.

While officials say there is no scientifically accurate way to count the rat population, de Blasio promised many thousands of rats would be eradicated.

Until now New Yorks main rodent weapon has been the so-called rat reservoir program, in which the city invested nearly $3 million in 2015 and which subjects concentrated areas to months of intense baiting.

In 2015, a New York rat shot to internet stardom when filmed walking down the stairs of a subway station with a slice of pizza in its mouth. The YouTube hit has been viewed nearly 10 million times. CBB

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New York unveils $32-million fight vs rats – Inquirer.net

Mice seen as invading City Hall – Philly.com – Philly.com

The shriekisinstantly recognizable.

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of

Well hear someone scream, and we know there is one out, said Alba Collazo, Philadelphias chief deputy register of wills.

A mouse, that is. Or, worse, plural.

Throughout its 116-year history, City Hall has had its fair share of vermin, but employees who have been there for decades say the current mice population is exploding.

Its infested. Ive never seen them this bad, said Matt Myers, inheritance tax chief, who has worked in the Register of Wills office for 30 years. Myers said that just last week, six to eight mice were caught in Room 180, the main reception area for the Register of Wills. Myers office is across the hall.

The Department of Public Property, however, says there is no problem. Through a city spokesman, department officials declined to be interviewed for this article. Instead, spokesman Mike Dunn offered four one-sentence bullet-point statements that said in part: There have been no reports from the pest control professionals indicating an increase in mice activity. And: There has been no emails or verbal conversations indicating an increase, from the pest folks.

Still, the citys pest-control costshave more than doubled in the last four years. In 2014, the city paid $55,777. This past fiscal year, which ended June 30, the city paid $133,573 for pest control. Increase in costs is due to bedbug treatments, Dunn said.

Bob Daily of Tri-County Pest Control points to a new trap he set up in the press office on the second floor of City Hall. (CLAUDIA VARGAS / Staff)

Myles Guevremont, general manager for Tri-County Pest Control, which has the pest control contract for City Hall, said he could not say whether there has been an increase in mice because this is the first year his company was contracted for pest control.

We dont really have anecdotal data to say, compared to last year it looks worse, Guevremont said.

But for those working on the first and second floors, this spring and early summer have been a contrast to prior years.

City Commissioner Al Schmidt, whos been in office since 2012, said that his first-floor office had not had any issues for a long time, but that within the last month, there had been a constant flow of mice in his office, and they were not there to register to vote.

We have 10 different types of traps set up, he said.

Recently, Schmidt caught the whiff of decomposition from an unseen corpse. The smell seemed to come from a back closet.

We tore it down to find it, Schmidt said. It was behind the water cooler.

Collazo, who has worked in the Register of Wills office for more than 30 years, said that every time there is construction nearby, the mice tend to be more active.

This has been our worst year that weve ever seen, Collazo said.

Experts say the problem likely has been exacerbated by people leaving foodbehind and the building not being properly sealed.

Martin Overline, president of Home Paramount Pest Control, which had the citys pest-control contract for several years until 2016, said the Department of Public Property needs to be involved in making sure there are not openings in the building to allow rodents in.

Mice usually follow utility lines. If the building is properly sealed, they cant travel along the lines, he said.

Carlos Hernandez, owner of Pest-A-Side, which until May had the largest pest-control contract with the city, blames the city for not having a designated eating area for employees.

I repeatedly said to them: put everything in a garbage disposal and get rid of it every day, Hernandez said. Dont eat at your desk. If you eat at your desk, of course mice are going to be around.

Guevremont, who now oversees pest control in City Hall, said that mice issues tend to be isolatedwithin specific offices and are not building-wide: The range of a mouse is very small. They are only traveling 15 to 30 feet from where there is a nest.

The Register of Wills office has sticky traps set up all alongthe perimeter of the floorboards.

Collazo said sometimes she can hear when the mice are caught on the sticky traps. Once they are dead, she can smell it: Ill call maintenance.

The customers who come in for birth certificates, marriage licenses, and services at the Register of Wills tend to be less scared than the employees who say they see the creatures almost daily.

A woman was sitting there, and she just goes, Oh, there goes the man with the brown shoes and fur coat, one of the Register of Wills receptionists said, reenacting her shock at the time.

The second-floor press office, across the hall from Mayor Kenneys suite, was also inundated with mice earlier this spring and into early summer. Sticky traps were set up to no avail, despite multiple sightings. A mice inspector set up a spring-loaded trap he called the neck-breaker. Two mice were caught on it within a week.

Bob Daily, an exterminator with Tri-County Exterminators, sets mouse traps around the City Hall press office.

On the other side of the second floor of City Hall, Room 296, which houses the Civil Filing Center, has been closed this summer due to bedbugs and renovations.

Hernandez, the citys former pest control manager, called the pest situation in city-run buildings very bad.

Bedbugs are sucking blood all over the place, he said. Theres mice running all over the place in police stations and fire stations.

As for the mice in City Hall, Collazo said, she is considering getting an office cat.

We would have to have a big one, she said.

Published: July 12, 2017 12:46 PM EDT

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Residents Question Conditions in Apartments Across Hartford | NBC … – NBC Connecticut

Dozens of complaints involving tenant issues in Hartford all trace back to the same property owner, and now residents are demanding action of city leaders and housing officials.

The complaints include things like windows being nailed shut, doors broken, mice infestation issues and more.

The NBC Connecticut Troubleshooters requested documents from the city of Hartford and learned that 22 of 30 properties owned by Ah Min Holding, LLC of New York City have complaints on file.

Residents are threatening a rent strike.

The Troubleshooters poured through hundreds of pages of open and closed complaints and violations from Hartford’s License and Inspections office.

There were a total of 129 complaints since 2011 for apartments owned by Ah Min Holding – a dozen of which remain active. Five were unfounded. Mice issues topped the list at 19 – followed by other rodents – eight, and roaches – seven.

Complaints also included no heat, broken refrigerator, no lights in hallway, bad smells in basement, clogged drain.

Tenant Yolanda Gonzalez told NBC Connecticut, there’s issues, there’s mices in the properties. When you tell them they do nothing about it.”

Dozens of other tenants living in these apartment buildings across Hartford’s north end say conditions are deplorable.

“For over two years I complain about the roaches and mice, manager didn’t respond,” said resident Joshua Serrano.

The company Ah Min Holding, LLC out of New York City, has 30 properties in Hartford, 26 of which are subsidized by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Milagros Ortiz is another resident who has filed a complaint.

My windows were broken. They fixed them by nailing them shut. If theres a fire blocking my door how will my children escape?” she said.

Some tenants said they are afraid to show their faces, out of fear they’ll get evicted.

One unidentified mother of four who spoke with NBC Connecticut has a brand new baby and ceiling leak.

The landlord you barely see him, you gotta argue and deal w/the office. Nothing getting fixed. There’s mold,” she said.

Others shared photos of mice traps and droppings.

Teri Morrison, I’ve experienced mice on my stove while I’m cooking.”

Many of the tenants are now banding together with the Christian Activities Council filling a local church to demand action.

On Tuesday Reverend AJ Johnson put community and HUD housing leaders on the spot.

“Will you provide apartments free from mice and mold, do you agree? he asked of city leaders and HUD leaders.

HUD leaders in Hartford and out of Boston now promise change.

As you’ve heard we’ve committed to all you’ve asked us to do. we don’t want you to be afraid to speak up to your local HUD office, said Suzanne Piacentini with HUD.

Joe Crisafulli of HUD actually apologized to the residents and said things would change.

NBC Connecticut also reached out to Ah Min Holding for comment.

This is the full statement from Emmanuel Ku, owner of Ah Min Holding.

Ah Min Holding, LLC is aware that several tenants have issues with housing at Clay Arsenal Renaissance Apartments (CARA). In particular Ah Min is aware and concerned about the increased rodent activities in the last several months due to the recent demolition of the meat packing building close by. Ah Min has worked continuously with the exterminating company to combat the problem. Progress is being made but the issue is not yet resolved. Ah Min encourages all tenants to sign up and partake in the free exterminating services for their apartments which Ah Min offers twice a week when the exterminator comes to provide treatment in the common areas of the property. We have undertaken recommendations irrespective of the cost by the exterminator. It is our mission to provide a safe and clean living environment to all tenants at CARA. Similarly, in 2011-2012 Ah Min fought to combat crime in the neighborhood by installing surveillance cameras on the property. The problem was not solved overnight but working together with the tenants and the police department, CARA became a safe place to live, walk and play. In 2012, 2013 and again in 2016 CARA received written commendations from the City of Hartford Police for their cooperation and efforts to combat crime in the community. CARA cares about the community and on a daily basis assist with cleanup of the surrounding neighborhood.

Christian Activities Council (CAC), a community base advocacy group, has complained to Ah Mins owner and staff about the rodent problem. Ah Min welcomes the opportunity to work with CAC to resolve this and other issues. Ah Min has held tenant meetings in the past which have proven to be very productive in engaging tenants to learn about issues and working together to resolve them. Unfortunately, CAC unilaterally scheduled a meeting for Tuesday July 11th with less than one week notice. Due to a scheduling conflict, I am unable to attend. I have requested CAC on two separate occasions to work with me to reschedule to a new date but no one at CAC has responded to my requests. I look forward to meeting with the representatives of CAC. In the meanwhile, Ah Min will continue to hold tenant meetings to resolve issues at CARA.

The City of Hartford also responded to the concerns:

Several weeks ago, we were made aware of the severity of unreported violations at this group of properties. Since then we have been in touch with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development as they have begun a thorough inspection process. The conditions in many of these apartments remain absolutely unacceptable, and we are grateful to residents for raising their concerns. We encourage residents to contact the city to report their complaints and allow our inspectors to review their property because it helps us build a record of problems we can refer to. Property owners have an obligation to provide safe and secure housing, and we will be as aggressive as possible in making sure these problems are addressed effectively, HartfordKiley Gosselin, Deputy Director of Hartford’s Department of Development Services said in a statement.

Published at 9:19 PM EDT on Jul 11, 2017 | Updated at 10:36 PM EDT on Jul 11, 2017

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Residents Question Conditions in Apartments Across Hartford | NBC … – NBC Connecticut

Hartford residents speak out on unsafe, unhealthy living conditions … – FOX 61

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HARTFORD — Residents of the Clay Arsenal Renaissance Apartments in the Clay Arsenal neighborhood of Hartford gathered Tuesday at the Shiloh Baptist Church on Albany Avenue to about their deplorable living conditions, demanding change.

Complaints included mice and cockroach infestations, broken windows, mold and shoddy maintenance jobs performed by a revolving door of non-uniformed employees.

“I have caught over 25 mice,” said resident Milagros Ortiz, ticking off the list of issues she has with her apartment on Main Street in Hartford. “If the wind blows, the window falls out.”

“There are broken tiles in front of the tub, which my son has cut his feet on coming out of the tub,” said Hartford resident Joshua Serrano.

Their apartments are justsome of the 150 unitsin Hartford owned by Emmanuel Ku.

Ku has received numerous citations for the 25 buildings he owns in Hartford, as well as thousands of housing code violations in New York City.

Housing and Urban Development, better known as HUD, has apologized. “The first thing I need to do is apologize, and on behalf of HUD, say we’re sorry,” said Joe Crisafulli, a HUD director out of Boston. “The stories that I’ve heard about are as far away from acceptable HUD housing as I’ve heard in my 29 years at HUD,” said Crisafulli.

“On behalf of HUD, we will be at your side until we resolve these issues,” said Suzanne Piacentini, director of the Hartford HUD field office.

HUD says it is now working to collect complaints from residents, conduct inspections and check with the city for open code violations. HUD is currently awaiting the results of an extensive inspection into the properties.

FOX61 received the following statement from Mr. Ku’s company, Ah Min Holding:

Ah Min Holding is aware that several tenants have issues with housing at Clay Arsenal Renaissance Apartments (CARA). In particular Ah Min is aware and concerned about the increased rodent activities in the last several months due to the recent demolition of the meat packing building close by. Ah Min has worked continuously with the exterminating company to combat the problem. Progress is being made but the issue is not yet resolved. Ah Min encourages all tenants to sign up and partake in the free exterminating services for their apartments which Ah Min offers twice a week when the exterminator comes to provide treatment in the common areas of the property. We have undertaken recommendations irrespective of the cost by the exterminator. It is our mission to provide a safe and clean living environment to all tenants at CARA. Similarly, in 2011-2012 Ah Min fought to combat crime in the neighborhood by installing surveillance cameras on the property. The problem was not solved overnight but working together with the tenants and the police department, CARA became a safe place to live, walk and play. In 2012, 2013 and again in 2016 CARA received written commendations from the City of Hartford Police for their cooperation and efforts to combat crime in the community. CARA cares about the community and on a daily basis assist with cleanup of the surrounding neighborhood.

Christian Activities Council (CAC), a community base advocacy group, has complained to Ah Mins owner and staff about the rodent problem. Ah Min welcomes the opportunity to work with CAC to resolve this and other issues. Ah Min has held tenant meetings in the past which have proven to be very productive in engaging tenants to learn about issues and working together to resolve them. Unfortunately, CAC unilaterally scheduled a meeting for Tuesday July 11th with less than one week notice. Due to a scheduling conflict, I am unable to attend. I have requested CAC on two separate occasions to work with me to reschedule to a new date but no one at CAC has responded to my requests. I look forward to meeting with the representatives of CAC. In the meanwhile, Ah Min will continue to hold tenant meetings to resolve issues at CARA.

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Hartford residents speak out on unsafe, unhealthy living conditions … – FOX 61

Apartment near Northlake infested with bed bugs, management slow to react – FOX 46 Charlotte

CHARLOTTE, NC (FOX 46 WJZY) –

The place Danielle Cook once called home is now home to something else.

“It doesn’t feel like home anymore, Danielle tells FOX 46.

I have to say, it was hard not to feel grossed out in the room where she found the culprits.

“That’s a bed bug and some babies or some eggs that were over there. they looked like little specks from here. You could only really see the big one,” says Danielle.

Danielle cook says she and her husband packed up their three kids and left their home behind.

“Now we’re living out of bags, trash bags. We’re all crammed into my mom’s two-bedroom apartment, a family of five,” Danielle says.

She says it took all of ten days for Ashton Reserve at Northlake to bring out an exterminator to treat her home.

“There are still bugs. they tell me they did a treatment but if there are still bugs I can’t be sure,” Danielle says.

The property manager called while we were in the apartment. She said the exterminator treated the family’s home on Monday, but the treatment calls for temperatures above 120 degrees, and to unplug the refrigerator to keep it from overheating.

Her main goal is make sure her neighbors are saved from going through the same thing.

Danielle asked the property manager if the whole building had been treated, or only her apartment. The property manager said she cannot release that information.

When we asked management about the bed bugs, they said we needed to talk to the media team.

We’ll continue to work to get results for the cook family and others living in Ashton Reserve at Northlake.

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Apartment near Northlake infested with bed bugs, management slow to react – FOX 46 Charlotte

Tips to keep rabies-carrying wildlife away from your home – WFXL FOX 31

Experts share tips to keep the wildlife that are susceptible to carrying the virus away./ Jazmyne Hankerson

After recent rabies exposures across the area, experts are sharing tips to keep the wildlife that are susceptible to carrying the virus away.

Experts say homeowners should keep anything that can be used as food or shelter as far away from the house as possible.

In Southwest Georgia bats, rats and squirrels are the animals that commonly carry rabies that experts often see.

“Rats love to eat seeds and things of that nature. it can be a rat feeding area after its a bird feeding area during the day. dog food. people may just go out there and dump dog food in the bowl and just eat it. and if the dog doesnt eat it all, some thing’s gone come and eat it, said Ben Tallent with Arrow Exterminators.

Tallent also said to make sure your home vents have covers and regularly check cracks or corners outside of your home that some rodents may find to gnaw on.

Doubling checking that your trash can is completely closed and keeping your grill cleaned (clear of grease and old food) can make a difference too.

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Tips to keep rabies-carrying wildlife away from your home – WFXL FOX 31

North End Residents Organize Against Alleged Neglect By Landlord – Hartford Courant

It started with a mouse bite, one little Isabella Garces received in the middle of the night a few months ago.

Word traveled fast as the 1-year-old lay in a room in St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center. Eventually, it reached the Rev. Ashley “AJ” Johnson, a community leader who knew Isabella’s mother through his work at Thirman Milner School.

Soon, Johnson saw firsthand the poor conditions that Isabella and her mother, Katiria Rivera, live in: mouse droppings in every room, an infestation so severe that Rivera’s uncle caught 31 rodents over the course of two days using glue strips.

Johnson began looking into the building’s owner, ultimately unraveling a network of subsidized housing in the North End that government officials last month said “raised serious health and safety concerns.”

“Hartford has to do better with situations like this,” Johnson said Monday. “This guy owns a concentrated area of poverty here, and no one has shed a light on it. And there are children living here.”

LAUREN SCHNEIDERMAN | lschneiderman@courant.com

The young pastor is holding a community meeting Tuesday afternoon in an attempt to call attention to Emmanuel Ku, the man behind the Clay Arsenal Renaissance Apartments. Ku, operating out of Queens, N.Y., owns 26 subsidized properties in Hartford, for a total of 150 rentable units, according to Rhonda Siciliano, a spokeswoman from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Ku’s battles with local housing boards have become highly publicized in other states, including Alabama, Michigan and New York.

At Johnson’s insistence, HUD officials inspected the apartment building where Rivera lives on May 30. The department issued a notice of default to Ku the next week that identified “several deficiencies that needed to be corrected right away,” according to a statement from the department’s local office.

LAUREN SCHNEIDERMAN | lschneiderman@courant.com

Those deficiencies included unsecured balconies at the building, the rodent infestation and the presence of mold in several units, Siciliano said.

Ku followed the instructions provided to him after the May inspection, the HUD statement reads. But the default notice came with an expanded inspection of 50 percent of the properties in the Renaissance Apartments, a move that the government agency noted was “much more intense than the usual sample.”

That second inspection was completed June 28 and 29, and the full results of it are not yet available, according to HUD.

“I know it’s not popular to organize around this, but it’s a crucial issue,” Johnson said. “Just because you’re on HUD housing doesn’t mean you’re not a person.”

Ku, in a statement to The Courant, said his company is aware of the issues at the apartments and is particularly concerned with the rodent issue, which he attributed to the recent demolition of a “meat packing building close by.” It’s unclear which building he was referring to.

Further, Ku said his company has worked continuously with an exterminator, but said the issue is not yet resolved. He encouraged tenants to sign up for the extermination service at no cost to them.

“We have undertaken recommendations irrespective of the cost by the exterminator,” Ku said. “It is our mission to provide a safe and clean living environment to all tenants at CARA.”

He also noted his company’s efforts to increase safety around the properties by installing security cameras and underscored his commitment to “engaging tenants to learn about issues and working together to resolve them.”

Josh Serrano hopes those words ring true. He lives inside a Ku-owned building on Main Street. A black patch of mold looms like a sore on the ceiling of one his bathrooms.

He said he had been complaining about conditions inside the apartment for three years. Work didn’t begin, he said, until HUD came calling last month. During their visit, he threw a glue strip into the building’s hallway to catch their attention. It was full of still-dying mice.

“To them, it’s nothing major, but my kids use this bathroom, I use this bathroom,” Serrano said. “If everything was really a ‘minor problem,’ nothing would get done.”

Last year, Ku received $1.6 million in rent subsidies from HUD for his Hartford properties, Siciliano said. City records show he bought all of his Hartford property on the same date in 2011 from another company that owned them, Clay Hill Associates.

Representatives from Mayor Luke Bronin’s office said they were unable Monday to immediately answer questions about the city’s record of inspections at the building where Rivera lives, or the other properties owned by Ku through his company, Ah Min Holding LLC.

Teri Morrison, a three-year tenant who lives in the same building as Rivera, hopes the city can provide those answers. She says she hasn’t had much luck in communicating with Ku and his colleagues.

“They try to blame all of our problems on us not being clean,” Morrison said as she stood in her kitchen, a “ground zero” for the mice in her apartment. “This building is just old and full of holes. If you buy something, if you invest in something, you have to make sure it’s safe and clean for the people living in it.”

Morrison has to clean mouse droppings daily, she said, and in a recent visit to her home tiny piles of them were hidden away in corners, near apparently ineffective glue traps. She’s taken to storing her bread and other bakery items in plastic bags, which she tacks to the walls above her cabinets. Fruit has to be stored in the fridge, she added.

Maintenance workers have sprayed foam sealant under her baseboard heaters three times, she said. Yet, the “mice keep getting better,” she said.

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North End Residents Organize Against Alleged Neglect By Landlord – Hartford Courant


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